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Kinesthetic Sense - The sense concerned with bodily position and movement of the body parts relative to each other
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Human Intelligence - The mental quality that consists of the abilities to learn from experience, adapt to new situations, understand and handle abstract concepts, and use knowledge to manipulate one’s environment. 
Cognitive-contextual theories deal with the way that cognitive processes operate in various settings. Two of the major theories of this type are that of the American psychologist Howard Gardner and that of Sternberg. In 1983 Gardner challenged the assumption of a single intelligence by proposing a theory of “multiple intelligences.” Earlier theorists had gone so far as to contend that intelligence comprises multiple abilities. But Gardner went one step farther, arguing that intelligences are multiple and include, at a minimum, linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, and intrapersonal intelligence. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Egypt: Valley of the Kings - Arabic Wādī Al-Mulūk, also called Valley of the Tombs of the Kings or Arabic Wādī Bībān al-Mulūk, long narrow defile just west of the Nile River in Upper Egypt. It was part of the ancient city of Thebes and was the burial site of almost all the kings (pharaohs) of the 18th, 19th, and 20th dynasties (1539–1075 bce), from Thutmose I to Ramses X. Located in the hills behind Dayr al-Baḥrī, the 62 known tombs exhibit variety both in plan and in decoration. In 1979 UNESCO designated the valley part of the World Heritage site of ancient Thebes, which also includes Luxor, the Valley of the Queens, and Karnak. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Empire - A major political unit in which the metropolis, or single sovereign authority, exercises control over territory of great extent or a number of territories or peoples through formal annexations or various forms of informal domination.  Empire has been a characteristic form of political organization since early antiquity and predates colonial rule by several centuries. The notion of empire also has outlasted the era of colonialism. Nonetheless, the colonial legacy still haunts former colonial empires and their erstwhile colonies. Many empires, however, were symbols of peace and prosperity, rather than of oppression and exploitation. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Egypt: Valley of the Queens - Also called Valley of the Tombs of the Queens, Arabic Wādī al-Bībān al-Harīm, or Wādī al-Harīm, gorge in the hills along the western bank of the Nile River in Upper Egypt. It was part of ancient Thebes and served as the burial site of the queens and some royal children of the 19th and 20th dynasties (1292–1075 bc). The queens’ necropolis is located about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of the mortuary temple of Ramses III (1187–56 bc) at Madīnat Habu. There are more than 90 known tombs, usually consisting of an entrance passage, a few short halls, and a sarcophagus chamber. The earliest may be that of Sitre, wife of Ramses I. The most notable are those of Nefertari, the favourite queen of Ramses II; of Princes Khaemwese and Amonhirkhopsef; and of a Ramesside queen called Titi. In 1979 UNESCO added the Valley of the Queens, the Valley of the Kings, Karnak, Luxor, and other sites of Thebes to the World Heritage List. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • United Kingdom - Is an island country located off the northwestern coast of mainland Europe. The United Kingdom comprises the whole of the island of Great Britain—which contains England, Wales, and Scotland—as well as the northern portion of the island of Ireland. The name Britain is sometimes used to refer to the United Kingdom as a whole. The capital is London, which is among the world’s leading commercial, financial, and cultural centres. Other major cities include Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester in England, Belfast and Londonderry in Northern Ireland, Edinburgh and Glasgow in Scotland, and Swansea and Cardiff in Wales.  Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Reino de España (Kingdom of Spain) - Is a country located in extreme southwestern Europe. It occupies about 85 percent of the Iberian Peninsula, which it shares with its smaller neighbour Portugal.  Spain is a storied country of stone castles, snowcapped mountains, vast monuments, and sophisticated cities, all of which have made it a favoured travel destination. The country is geographically and culturally diverse. Its heartland is the Meseta, a broad central plateau half a mile above sea level. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Sweden - A country located on the Scandinavian Peninsula in northern Europe. The name Sweden was derived from the Svear, or Suiones, a people mentioned as early as 98 ce by the Roman author Tacitus. The country’s ancient name was Svithiod. Stockholm has been the permanent capital since 1523.  Sweden occupies the greater part of the Scandinavian Peninsula, which it shares with Norway. The land slopes gently from the high mountains along the Norwegian frontier eastward to the Baltic Sea. Geologically, it is one of the oldest and most stable parts of the Earth’s crust. Its surface formations and soils were altered by the receding glaciers of the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2,600,000 to 11,700 years ago). Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Thailand - Is country located in the centre of mainland Southeast Asia. Located wholly within the tropics, Thailand encompasses diverse ecosystems, including the hilly forested areas of the northern frontier, the fertile rice fields of the central plains, the broad plateau of the northeast, and the rugged coasts along the narrow southern peninsula.  Until the second half of the 20th century, Thailand was primarily an agricultural country, but since the 1960s increasing numbers of people have moved to Bangkok, the capital, and to other cities. Although the greater Bangkok metropolitan area remains the preeminent urban centre in the country, there are other sizable cities, such as Chiang Mai in the north, Nakhon Ratchasima (Khorat), Khon Kaen, and Udon Thani in the northeast, Pattaya in the southeast, and Hat Yai in the far south. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Netherlands - Is a country located in northwestern Europe, also known as Holland. “Netherlands” means low-lying country; the name Holland (from Houtland, or “Wooded Land”) was originally given to one of the medieval cores of what later became the modern state and is still used for 2 of its 12 provinces (Noord-Holland and Zuid-Holland). A parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarch, the kingdom includes its former colonies in the Lesser Antilles: Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, Sint Eustatius, and Sint Maarten. The capital is Amsterdam and the seat of government The Hague. The country is indeed low-lying and remarkably flat, with large expanses of... Learn more via Britannica.com
  • Africa: Fāṭimid Dynasty - A political and religious dynasty that dominated an empire in North Africa and subsequently in the Middle East from ad 909 to 1171 and tried unsuccessfully to oust the ʿAbbāsid caliphs as leaders of the Islāmic world. It took its name from Fāṭimah, the daughter of the Prophet Muḥammad, from whom the Fāṭimids claimed descent.  Before the Fāṭimids, there had been other rulers in North Africa and Egypt who had succeeded in making themselves virtually independent of the ʿAbbāsid caliphs in Baghdad; but they had been Muslims of the Sunnī branch of Islām, willing to recognize the token suzerainty of the caliph as head of the Islāmic community. Learn more via Britannica.com
  • China: Wei dynasty - Chinese in full (Pinyin) Bei Wei or (Wade-Giles romanization) Pei Wei, English Northern Wei, also called Tabgatch or (Pinyin) Tuoba, (386–534/535 ce), the longest-lived and most powerful of the northern Chinese dynasties that existed before the reunification of China under the Sui and Tang dynasties.  The Wei dynasty was founded by Tabgatch (Tuoba) tribesmen who, like many of the nomads inhabiting the frontiers of northern China, were of uncertain origin. Their language was basically Turkic, and scholars presume that their ancestry can be traced to proto-Turkic, proto-Mongol, or Xiongnu peoples. In any case, the Tuoba were non-Han Chinese, and their conquests of the small, weak North China states in the late 4th century were clearly regarded as foreign invasions. After the takeover of Shanxi province, the Tuoba adopted the ancient name of Wei for their kingdom and established their capital at Pingcheng (present-day Datong), close to their tribal homeland. Learn more via Britannica.com
EMPIRES, DYNASTIES & KINGDOMS
  • India - The earliest periods of Indian history are known only through reconstructions from archaeological evidence. Since the late 20th century, much new data has emerged, allowing a far fuller reconstruction than was formerly possible. This section will discuss five major periods: (1) the early prehistoric period (before the 8th millennium bce), (2) the period of the prehistoric agriculturalists and pastoralists (approximately the 8th to the mid-4th millennium bce), (3) the Early Indus, or Early Harappan, Period (so named for the excavated city of Harappa in eastern Pakistan), witnessing the emergence of the first cities in the Indus River system (c. 3500–2600 bce), (4) the Indus, or Harappan, civilization (c. 2600–2000 bce, or perhaps ending as late as 1750 bce), and (5) the Post-Urban Period, which follows the Indus civilization and precedes the rise of cities in northern India during the second quarter of the 1st millennium bce (c. 1750–750 bce). Learn more via Britannica.com